Yuba State Park

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Yuba State Park got its name from the individuals who built the dam. Local farmers and ranchers had to build the dam themselves or risk losing their water rights. The men working on the structure called it the U.B. Dam. As they worked they sang a song that stated they were damned if they worked and damned if they didn’t. The phonetic sound of the reservoirs name was eventually spelled Yuba.

Yuba Reservoir was built between 1902 and 1917. In spring 1907, the amount of snowmelt was so high that water began pouring out of the reservoir faster than could be released by the spillway. Members of the Mormon Church at Deseret, 40 miles to the west, responded to the threatened structure by blasting a temporary spillway to relieve pressure on the dam.

Visitors with a good eye can sometimes find evidence of the ancient Native Americans that once lived in the area. Rock art, pieces of pottery, and stone tools are among items that have been found around the reservoir. Remnants of mining and ranching that took place in the area are also visible to those with an interest in older cultures. Visitors are allowed to explore the area, but area asked not to disturb or remove any artifacts. Any findings should be reported to Utah State Parks and Recreation.

Opened to the public as a state park in 1970.
Park Elevation:  5,100 feet
ZIP LINES!!!  Yuba has two zip lines installed and ready for use! One zip line is 850 feet and the other is 650 feet.  They are located just North of the Oasis campground.